Roadway Designer Manual: 3 - Roadway Designer

Introduction

The Roadway Designer is a highly interactive application that allows a majority of the road design to be completed within the application itself, thereby minimizing the amount of design performed in the surface model. Use this application to create new design surfaces that represent a new roadway or other type of surface.

To run the Roadway Designer

At a minimum, the following requirements are needed:

After the templates are created, they are applied using Roadway Designer. Roadway Designer combines alignments, surfaces, and templates to create a model of the proposed roadway. It is also where superelevation is applied to the design.

Roadway Designer requires certain preferences be set up prior to accessing the tool. These preferences (DDB, Plan Graphics, Geometry, DTM) are stored in a Roadway Designer preference file, which has the extension .rdp (Roadway Designer Preferences).

Important This file is stored in the working directory and should not be deleted.

To load the preference file select File > Load from the pull‐down menu on the Corridor Modeler dialog then select the appropriate preference file.

The Roadway Designer tool is accessed by selecting the Open Roadway Designer icon from the Corridor Modeling dialog.

Location of Roadway Designer on Corridor Modeling dialog

Figure 1

Roadway Designer Interface

The Roadway Designer dialog has three window viewing areas, representing the plan, profile, and cross section views of the design.  These views use their own graphics engine, like the Create Template dialog, and are not MicroStation views.  The views show only what is related to the design, not what is displayed in the MicroStation file.  The content of each window is controlled by the active Corridor selection and Active Surface settings.  The Roadway Designer dialog is resizable.  Each window in the Roadway Designer can also be individually resized.

Roadway Designer dialog

Figure 2

Plan, Profile, and Cross Section Views, Commands and Settings

Plan View

The Plan View window is located in the upper left corner of the Roadway Designer dialog.  Although it looks like a standard view, the Plan View window does not display the graphics in the CAD file. 

Roadway Designer dialog, Plan highlighted

Figure 3

Not having the CAD graphics displayed allows focus on the design data only.  Template drops are displayed as short brown lines.  A template drop is the location where a new template begins.  The Plan window is linked to the other windows in Roadway Designer via station positioning of the design.  The station position is shown as the longer yellow line.  Other graphics in this window include the corridor centerline, original ground surface perimeter, and cut-fill lines.  As the complexity of the design intensifies, other graphic indicators appear in the window.  Mouse-over tips are available and view controls are located on the bottom of all of the Roadway Designer’s view windows.

At the bottom of the graph are numerous view commands which allow you to manipulate the view of the template. These operate similar to MicroStation view commands. If your mouse has a scroll wheel, it can be used to pan and zoom. The two buttons with the left and right scroll icons are used to undo and redo template creation operations. Also, pressing the CTRL button and Z key on the keyboard at the same time will undo your last edit or creation.

In the Plan, Profile, or Cross Section view, holding down the SHIFT key on the keyboard and using the scroll wheel on the mouse at the same time will result in the vertical view scale factor being changed.  Holding down the CTRL key on the keyboard and using the scroll wheel on the mouse at the same time will result in the horizontal view scale factor being changed.  

Profile View

The Profile View window is located in the lower left corner of the Roadway Designer dialog.  It displays the Original ground surface line and the corridor’s vertical alignment. 

Roadway Designer dialog, Profile highlighted

Figure 4

It is also linked to the station position of the design and that location is shown as a vertical yellow line.  The scale of the Profile View window is dynamic based on the zoom controls.

At the bottom of the graph are numerous view commands which allow you to manipulate the view of the template. These operate similar to MicroStation view commands. If your mouse has a scroll wheel, it can be used to pan and zoom. The two buttons with the left and right scroll icons are used to undo and redo template creation operations. Also, pressing the CTRL button and Z key on the keyboard at the same time will undo your last edit or creation.

In the Plan, Profile, or Cross Section view, holding down the SHIFT key on the keyboard and using the scroll wheel on the mouse at the same time will result in the vertical view scale factor being changed.  Holding down the CTRL key on the keyboard and using the scroll wheel on the mouse at the same time will result in the horizontal view scale factor being changed.  

Cross Section View

The Cross Section View window is located on the right side of the Roadway Designer dialog.  It displays the Active surface line, (typically, existing ground) and the templates as they are applied to the design. 

Roadway Designer dialog, Cross Section highlighted

Figure 5

This window will be a primary area for reviewing the design.  Additional display settings can be applied by right-clicking on the window.  The scale of the Cross Section View window is dynamic based on the zoom controls.

At the bottom of the graph are numerous view commands which allow you to manipulate the view of the template. These operate similar to MicroStation view commands. If your mouse has a scroll wheel, it can be used to pan and zoom. The two buttons with the left and right scroll icons are used to undo and redo template creation operations. Also, pressing the CTRL button and Z key on the keyboard at the same time will undo your last edit or creation.

In the Plan, Profile, or Cross Section view, holding down the SHIFT key on the keyboard and using the scroll wheel on the mouse at the same time will result in the vertical view scale factor being changed.  Holding down the CTRL key on the keyboard and using the scroll wheel on the mouse at the same time will result in the horizontal view scale factor being changed.  

Located directly below the Cross Section View window is an area that displays the current station.  Several buttons are available to step through the design, based on stationing.

Commands

The upper portion of the dialog contains all the tools and commands for performing design and editing functions. There are pulldown lists as well as frequently used icons for easy access to commands.

Roadway Designer dialog, Commands highlighted

Figure 6

The command portion of the dialog allows development of corridors and provides functionality such as:

Settings

The bottom portion of the dialog is where various settings can be modified for things such as the active surface and active corridor.

Roadway Designer dialog, Settings highlighted

Figure 7

This is also the area that allows stepping through the design at incremental stations and processes any changes that have been implemented.

There are three mode options in the lower right of the dialog that will change the display depending on the process being worked on. These are Normal, Superelevation and Overlay and each will re-configure the display to accommodate input for each process.

Manage Corridors

A Corridor is a design section of roadway defined by the station limits of the mainline’s horizontal and vertical alignment.  A corridor is created by using Corridor > Corridor Management.  To create a Corridor, name the Corridor, select a horizontal and vertical alignment, and optionally set the station limits of the project.  

Manage Corridors dialog

Figure 8

Important The data input into Roadway Designer is saved in the Roadway Design file, which has the extension .ird.  A single roadway design file (.ird) can store multiple corridors for a project.  To  perform “what-if” scenarios, save the results to different Roadway Definition (.ird extension) files. 

Important The .ird file can only be opened by one user at a time.

The surface symbology is also specified when a corridor is created.  This surface symbology is used to display the corridor surface in the Roadway Designer cross section view when the corridor is displayed as a target alias.  Also, the symbology is used to set the surface cross section and profile symbologies when an individual surface is created from the corridor.

Template Drops

Template Drops assign previously created templates to specific stations in the corridor.  The template origin (xy=0,0) tracks on the corridor’s horizontal and vertical alignment to form the proposed roadway. 

Template Drops dialog

Figure 9

To create template drops, select the appropriate template from the template library, the station where the template is applied, and the modeling interval.  The final result is a station and template list.

Whenever two or more different templates are applied to a single corridor using the Roadway Designer, transitioning between the templates occurs. For example, a template transition occurs when the roadway design changes from a two‐lane to a four‐lane roadway.

Template transitions occur between templates that have different names in the Template Drops dialog. To hold a template cross section through a station range, assign the template at its starting station and assign the same template again at the station where it starts its transition.

Point Controls

Template Point Controls are used to override the normal horizontal and vertical locations of template points during the modeling process. Design examples include lane widening, ramp and intersection design, superelevation, and divided highways with separate grade lines. 

Point Controls dialog

Figure 10

These overrides are accomplished by assigning template point names to alignments or surface features. The assigned template points will follow the alignments or surface features using horizontal and/or vertical controls within a specified station range.

End Condition Exceptions

End condition exceptions are used to override end conditions along a range of corridor stations.

End Condition Exceptions dialog

Figure 11

To create end condition exceptions, enter the station range and specify which side of the road is being overridden.  Click Edit to edit the end condition. This brings up a dialog box similar to the Create Template dialog; however, the dialog shows only the end conditions on the specified override side.  All other non‐end condition components are shown as dashed lines.  Override the end condition using the familiar Create Template tools.

Sometimes the end conditions are not desired in the design, for example, when the corridor passes through an intersection or crosses a bridge.  To eliminate end conditions for a range of stations, create an end condition exception and select the Backbone Only option.

End condition exceptions are displayed in the Plan View window as a cyan colored shape.

Left Override dialog

Figure 12

End Condition Transitions

An End Condition Transition provides tools for the user to specify exactly how to transition from one end condition to another. An Example of this may be a simple cut to fill or a ditch to a fill section. This tool can be used anytime there the template points change from one section to the next.

At every Template Drop Interval, the Roadway Designer processes and solves the End Condition solutions. When two solutions result in a different number of End Condition points or the End Condition point names don’t match, the End Condition Exceptions command can be used to transition the End Condition solutions.

Important Double‐click the shape to access the End Condition Exceptions dialog.

End Condition Exceptions dialog

Figure 13

Provide a description for the transition and click the option to apply Left or Right Transition.

End Condition Exceptions dialog

Figure 14

Click the Edit button and the Edit Transition dialog will appear. The Edit Transition dialog is very similar to the one used for template transitions, except only End Condition are transitioned using this dialog. This dialog shows the End Conditions at the beginning and end of the transition. Move the End Conditions by right‐clicking on a point and selecting Move Template. Moving the End Conditions is helpful for to improve visualization of the transition.

A bold red plus sign indicates there is no connection. Click on the bold red plus signs and connect them to the appropriate points on the other End Conditions. Click the OK button when all the connections are complete. This will bring up the Edit Transition Midpoint dialog.

Edit Transition dialog

Figure 15

Clicking OK allows verifies the end condition is transitioning correctly before applying it to the design.

Use the Transition slider on the Edit Transition Midpoint dialog to check the transition. It is not necessary to change the constraints for the End Condition transition to function properly. Click OK when the transition is working properly. Click Cancel if the transition is not working properly. Clicking Cancel will return you to the Edit Transition dialog.

Display Reference

The Display References tool improves the visualization of the Plan View.  The Display References tool allows Surface features and horizontal alignments to be displayed in the Plan View.  

Display References dialog

Figure 16

This would be used to display Alignments and Surface features that are not being used as Point Controls or Secondary Alignments, since they are automatically displayed.  

Important The Surface features and alignments reference are displayed as a Violet color and are children of the Active Corridor. Display as Right of Way must be checked on to indicate whether or not the reference should be displayed as a right-of-way reference in the cross section view.

See continuation of Section 3 - Roadway Designer

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